In the busy world of hotels, pubs, bars and hospitality in general, moves are afoot towards embracing the ethics that surround all aspects of introducing sustainability into the blueprint of the business.

After all, increasing numbers of your existing and prospective customers are likely to be ethical buyers who are discerning in what they buy and the environment in which they spend their time.

Pub Stuff offers recycled contract pub furniture to the pub, hospitality and leisure trade and are in the maelstrom of growing interest from commercial customers grasping the concept of upcycling furniture.

Breathing new life into the recycled products which come from managed houses when they refurbish, Pub Stuff are able to offer a huge range of quality recycled furniture. The high quality finish and end result is achieved through careful refurbishment and attention to changing trends in the hospitality market reflected in a wide choice of fabrics, soft furnishings and furniture styles.

This has come about not only because of the bite of the recession of recent years where upcycling proves a cost effective approach, but it is environmentally friendly too. What could be better than calling a halt to skips filled with discarded, perfectly good furniture?

Complementing huge stocks of recycled contract furniture, Pub Stuff also commission new lines of furniture which are made from Rubberwood derived from latex producing trees. Latex is of course used to produce all rubber-based products that can be found around the globe.

Once the latex has been drained from the tree, after a usage of around 20+ years, the tree is considered to be waste and is felled with a new tree planted in its place. This therefore presents an opportunity to create new durable furniture using wood that will not deplete vital resources and whose sole existence is not only to produce furniture. Hence the concept of sustainability is well used by re-using something that would have otherwise gone to waste.

Rubber wood, or Hevea Brasiliensis, is a member of the maple family and is ideally suited to this purpose as it is a stable and close grain wood which means that it contains a low water content of between 8 – 10%.

During the kiln drying process it is easily controlled and has very little shrinkage. This ensures minimal movement either during the manufacturing and assembly stage or as a finished product situated in a centrally heated environment or directly adjacent to a radiator.

It is not indigenous to the UK and, given the demand for latex to create rubber products, supplies are readily available to cope with demand.